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Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Liberals Claim Trump 'Signed Death Warrant for Planet Earth,' Began 'Extinction of Human Life'? So You Set, Fires at Anti-Trump DC Protest Trying To Save The Planet?

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As soon as President Donald Trump signed an executive order to eliminate climate-related environmental regulations burdening the U.S. energy industry, liberals pounced on the chance to declare the end of life as we know it.

“The extinction of human life on Earth” has begun, liberal filmmaker Michael Moore Tweeted, claiming that historians will soon look back on this day and blame Trump’s executive orders for their demise:

http://www.cnsnews.com/blog/craig-bannister/liberals-claim-trump-signed-death-warrant-planet-earth-began-extinction-human

 So this how you save the planet, bye, destroying the  plant , you claim, your try to save? 

1.Watch: Explosions, Fires at Anti-Trump DC Protest 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIj9mLSn4R4

 2.“Screw Our President” Says Boy After Starting Fire to Protest Trump 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_9t4w6Diy5s 

3.Anti-Trump Protester lights a girl's hair on fire! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eY5WTDgV4ik&t=22s

4.Anti Trump protesters set a limo on fire amid inauguration festivals. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-yCnGTwyok

 5.Anti Trump protesters can be seen smashing Windows in Washington on the day of his inauguration

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aV-ntraM7-I

6.Mexico: Anti-Trump protesters set fire to piñata effigy 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Gdr_fHSZfo

7.UC Berkeley: Anti-Trump protesters beating Trump supporter Bloody, Unconscious 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3fT6pnhjJA

 


 


Saturday, March 25, 2017

DELINGPOLE: Climate Change Caused Brexit Explains Al Gore…

brexit Gore, who was speaking at an event to promote his latest global warming propaganda documentary – An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power – said the Brexit vote in Britain last summer was the result of “political instability” created by the “stress” caused by climate-change induced chaos in the Middle East.

It all began in Syria, Gore explained, unchallenged by a fawning interviewer from the film magazine Empire.

He proceeded to outline his lavishly complex climate conspiracy theory involving climate change, Syria, and Wikileaks:

“One of the lines of investigation [scientists] have been pursuing has led them to the conclusion that significant areas of the Middle East and North Africa are in danger of becoming uninhabitable
“And, just a taste of this, to link it to some of the events that the UK and European Union are going through – think for a moment about what happened in Syria.

“Before the gates of hell opened in Syria, what happened was a climate-related extreme drought.
http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/03/24/delingpole-climate-change-caused-brexit-explains-al-gore/

Monday, March 20, 2017

Oops Al Gore ‘Scientists’ Wrong Again! ‘ Overlooked Effect Of ‘Dead Zones’ On Coral Reefs Not global warming. Not Ocean Acidification., –A Low-Oxygen Area That Snuffs Out Marine life


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Key quotes:
… they suspected it was caused by a dead zone–a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life–rather than by ocean warming or acidification…
The team thinks that such dead zones may be common in the tropics but have gone largely unreported, simply because scientists never looked…

Based on our analyses, we think dead zones may be underreported by an order of magnitude…
The media release is below.
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Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide
SMITHSONIAN TROPICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE
Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study by Smithsonian scientists published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone–a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life–rather than by ocean warming or acidification.

“Ocean warming and acidification are recognized global threats to reefs and require large-scale solutions, whereas the newly recognized threats to coral reefs caused by dead zones are more localized, said Andrew Altieri, staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and first author of the study. Fortunately dead zones can be reduced by controlling sewage and agricultural runoff into the ocean.”

In September, 2010, coral reefs in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro Province, showed severe signs of stress. In addition to corals turning white and dying, which is typical during coral bleaching associated with warming events, there were other clues suggesting that more was involved than high temperatures. Many unusual observations pointed to something else as the culprit. There were thick mats of bacterial slime, and the dead bodies of crabs, sea urchins and sponges lay scattered on the ocean floor. Even more odd, there was a clear depth line above which the reefs looked OK, and below which, something had gone terribly wrong. Even single colonies of corals that straddled the line were fine above and dying below.

Scientists went to work, measuring several aspects of water quality. One set of measurements came back as a shock. Extremely low oxygen levels in deeper waters contrasted with high oxygen levels in shallow waters where corals were still healthy. This is the hallmark of a dead zone.

The team thinks that such dead zones may be common in the tropics but have gone largely unreported, simply because scientists never looked. “The number of dead zones currently on our map of the world is 10 times higher in temperate areas than it is in the tropics, but many marine biologists work out of universities in Europe and North America and are more likely to find dead zones close to home,” Altieri said.

“We were lucky that there was already a reef monitoring program in place at STRI’s Bocas del Toro Research Station as part of the Smithsonian’s Marine Global Earth Observatory Network,” said Rachel Collin, station director.

“Based on our analyses, we think dead zones may be underreported by an order of magnitude.” said Nancy Knowlton, coauthor and Sant Chair for Marine Science at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “For every one dead zone in the tropics, there are probably 10–nine of which have yet to be identified.”

The researchers found 20 instances when dead zones were implicated in the mass mortality of coral reefs worldwide. “Hypoxia (low oxygen) isn’t even mentioned in several of the most important academic reviews of threats to coral reefs and is rarely discussed at scientific meetings,” Altieri said, “Even worse, many coral-reef monitoring efforts do not include measurement of oxygen levels, making it nearly impossible to identify low oxygen as the cause of mass coral mortality after the fact.” For example, the cause of a 2016 mass mortality at the Flower Garden Reefs in the Gulf of Mexico remains unclear, but some of the photographs look strikingly similar to what was observed in Panama.

The authors argue that building capacity to monitor oxygen on reefs will help people to improve coral reef health and understand how dead zones might interact with other forces such as global warming in a one-two punch, which put reefs in even greater danger.
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The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, headquartered in Panama City, Panama, is a part of the Smithsonian Institution. The Institute furthers the understanding of tropical nature and its importance to human welfare, trains students to conduct research in the tropics and promotes conservation by increasing public awareness of the beauty and importance of tropical ecosystems. Website. Promo video.
Andrew H. Altieri, Seamus Harrison, Janina Seeman, Rachel Collin, Robert J. Diaz, Nancy Knowlton . 2017. Tropical dead zones and mass mortalities on coral reefs. PNAS http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1621517114

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Proving Al Gore Wrong Again! Claim: Immediate Action To Reduce Global Warming Needed To Protect Great Barrier Reef , Now Al Gore Want To Cool The Coral Sea

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When water is too warm, corals will expel the algae (zooxanthellae) living in their tissues causing the coral to turn completely white. This is called coral bleaching. When a coral bleaches, it is not dead. Corals can survive a bleaching event, but they are under more stress and are subject to mortality.


Can corals recover from bleaching?
As the sea temperatures cool during winter, corals that have not starved may overcome a bleaching event and recover their symbionts. However, even if they survive, their reproductive capacity is reduced, leading to long-term damage to reef systems.



Immediate action” to cool the Coral Sea, or at least part of it? What? How?
The media release and abstract is below. The paper is here.
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Climate science: Bleaching causes grief to the Great Barrier Reef
Immediate action to reduce global warming is needed to protect coral reefs from severe bleaching events, according to research published in this week’s Nature. A detailed analysis of the Great Barrier Reef over the past two decades shows that extreme heat is the key driver of mass bleaching. As temperatures continue to rise, further bleaching events are likely, which may push the reef system beyond recovery.
Rising sea surface temperatures due to global warming have triggered major bleaching events in tropical coral reefs, and this damage can be potentially fatal to these delicate ecosystems. The most severe event in 2016, driven by record temperatures in the 2015–2016 El Niño event, bleached over 90% of the corals in the Great Barrier Reef.
To understand more about the effects of climate change on reefs, Terry Hughes and colleagues assessed three major bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016. By analysing individual reefs, the authors determine why some corals are more prone to bleaching than others. They find that the distinctive geographical footprint of bleaching is primarily driven by patterns of sea temperatures; in general, unbleached reefs were located towards the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef, where waters are generally cooler. Local management of reef fisheries and water quality offered little to no protection against extreme heat, but the authors note that these efforts may help these ecosystems to recover from bleaching events. However, it is unlikely that the Great Barrier Reef will ever fully recover from the severe bleaching that occurred in 2016, and the security of coral reefs requires urgent and rapid global action to curb future warming, the authors conclude.